Cregboy townland minor placenames

The minor placenames of the townland of Cregboy, Claregalway, Co. Galway

O'Flaherty

The minor placenames of the townland of Cregboy, Claregalway, Co. Galway

The townland of Cregboy covers an area of approximately 676 acres, south of the village of Claregalway. At the time of the Ordnance Survey in the 1830s, Cregboy was recorded in the Ordnance Survey Name Books as being ‘the property Mr. Lynch, half the surface of this townland is covered with limestone rock, the remainder under tillage’.  At the time of this survey Cregboy is recorded locally as Creg Buidhe meaning ‘yellow cliffs’ although the word Creig may also be translated as ‘rock’. The placename almost certainly makes reference to the rough rocky ground across large parts of the townland (Creige). Buidhe or Buí may refer to lichen or gorse that was present on this rocky ground. 

Although the townland is well populated today, in the mid-19th century there were just two house clusters marked along Cregboy road on the First Edition Ordnance Survey 6-inch Sheet. The remainder of settlement was located on the Galway-Tuam Road at this time. Much of the townland is marked as rough grazing in small parcels of land. No minor placenames were recorded within the townland at this time.

Our work in the townland during 2020 identified 24 minor placenames and places of interest known locally within the townland. These are marked on the map below, and included in tabulated format. These placenames were collected by Pat Coen, Marie Dempsey and Seoirse Morris from John and Tom Fahy and from Martin Giles. The placenames collected refer to fields, wells, rocks, houses, trees, ringforts, sites associated with the War of Independence, and other elements of the local landscape.

This work is on-going. If you know of any other minor placenames in the parish of Claregalway that may be of interest, and you would like to contribute to our survey, please do get in touch.


Placename (Gaeilge)Placename (English)CollectorInformantDetails
Páirc Na SeaggaighField of the foalsPat CoenJohn/Tom FahyA field in the middle of the ‘Creggs’ where foals were sent on weaning
An TuaránPat CoenJohn/Tom FahyA field beside the quarry which was always wet (swamp) due to the presence of a well
Garraí GleannaPat CoenJohn/Tom FahyA field in the glen
The MountainPat CoenJohn/Tom FahyAn area of scrubland that was reclaimed
Gort na gCúilíníPat CoenJohn/Tom FahyAn area comprising the farms of Paddy Shaughnessy and Ritchie Fahy and Paddy Fahy
WellPat CoenJohn/Tom FahyWell with steps leading down and large stone slab for a roof
Gort Na GlasaPat CoenMartin GilesOne of the few green fields in Cregboy where cows were sent to graze
Mass Path StepsPat CoenMartin GilesTwo groups of stones reputedly part of a mass path
WellPat CoenMartin GilesA well that is now covered in
WellPat CoenMartin GilesA well in front of Rockwood House
GortsmithSeoirse MorrisSeoirse Morris
An ChatharSeoirse MorrisSeoirse Morris
Páirc Uí LeasSeoirse MorrisSeoirse Morris
Maire Ní MhainínSeoirse MorrisSeoirse MorrisContaining the small ruin of an old house
Hiding HoleSeoirse MorrisSeoirse MorrisA hole in the limestone rock used as a refuge by Charlie Quinn when on the run in 1921. From William Morris and Johnny Quiin, son of Charlie
Hiding HoleSeoirse MorrisSeoirse MorrisAn iron axle of a horse cart supporting the stone wall. Underneath was a hole (now filled) also used as a refuge by Charlie Quinn
Tobar EornaMarie DempseySeoirse MorrisWell – No longer extant
CloshMarie DempseySeoirse MorrisA pool – Now filled in
Famine treeMarie DempseySeoirse MorrisAn ash tree to mark the end of the famine planted by Celia Byrne, great grandmother of Marie Dempsey (Boyle)
Páirc an GhiorriaMarie DempseySeoirse MorrisField of the hare
Field belowMarie DempseySeoirse Morris
Small RockMarie DempseySeoirse Morris
WellMarie DempseySeoirse MorrisWell, now closed in
Sean Teach an PhobailMarie DempseySeoirse MorrisHouse
This page was added on 07/01/2022.

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